Help:List

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See Help:Editing #Lists for basic list syntax.

Lists can get complicated, if they are nested in other lists, items get longer than just one line, for instance whole paragraphs. Items contain images and so on. The wiki markup is optimized for simple lists, for complex lists MediaWiki allows for embedding HTML all three types of lists.

Unordered lists

<ul>
<li>
One item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor 
invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et 
accusam et justo duo dolores 
</li>
<li>
Another item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor 
invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. 
At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores 
</li>
</ul>
  • One item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores
  • Another item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores

Numbered lists

Numbered (or ordered) list show an ascending number for each item by default. It is possible to change this style, see sections #roman numbers or #latin letters for how.

<ol>
<li>
One item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor 
invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et 
accusam et justo duo dolores 
</li>
<li>
Another item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor 
invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et 
accusam et justo duo dolores 
</li>
</ol>
  1. One item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores
  2. Another item that contains much text even if it isn't really interesting to read all of it: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores

roman numbers

  1. One item
  2. Another item
  1. One item
  2. Another item

latin letters

  1. One item
  2. Another item
  1. One item
  2. Another item

Description lists

Here are examples for huge descriptions for terms in definition lists that contain floating images as illustrations and tables.

<dl>
<dt>Cent</dt>
<dd>[[File:Test-120x60px.png|right|60px]] The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. Twelve-tone equal temperament divides the octave into 12 semitones of 100 cents each. Typically, cents are used to express small intervals, or to compare the sizes of comparable intervals in different tuning systems, and in fact the interval of one cent is too small to be heard between successive notes.

Alexander J. Ellis based the measure on the acoustic logarithms decimal semitone system developed by Gaspard de Prony in the 1830s, at Robert Holford Macdowell Bosanquet's suggestion. Ellis made extensive measurements of musical instruments from around the world, using cents extensively to report and compare the scales employed,[1] and further described and employed the system in his 1875 edition of Hermann von Helmholtz's On the Sensations of Tone. It has become the standard method of representing and comparing musical pitches and intervals. (from: ''[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cent_(music) Cent (music) - Wikipedia]'') </dd>
<dt>Monzo</dt>
<dd>For example, the interval 15/8 can be thought of as having 5*3 in the numerator, and 2*2*2 in the denominator. This can be compactly represented by the expression 2^-3 * 3^1 * 5^1, which is exactly equal to 15/8. We construct the monzo by taking the exponent from each prime, in order, and placing them within the {{Monzo| ... }} brackets, hence yielding {{Monzo|-3 1 1}}. 

:''Practical hint:'' Because the pipe symbol and the greater sign have special meaning in wiki syntax and HTML, there is a helper template ([[Template:Monzo]]) that can be used like this {{Monzo|arguments}} to get the monzo brackets (<code>{{Monzo|arguments}}</code>) from it.

Here are some common 5-limit monzos, for your reference:

{| class="wikitable"
|-
! Ratio
! Monzo
|-
| style="text-align:center;" | [[3/2]]
| {{Monzo| -1 1 0 }}
|-
| style="text-align:center;" | [[5/4]]
| {{Monzo| -2 0 1 }}
|-
| style="text-align:center;" | [[9/8]]
| {{Monzo| -3 2 0 }}
|-
| style="text-align:center;" | [[81/80]]
| {{Monzo| -4 4 -1 }}
|}
</dd>
</dl>
Cent
Test-120x60px.png
The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. Twelve-tone equal temperament divides the octave into 12 semitones of 100 cents each. Typically, cents are used to express small intervals, or to compare the sizes of comparable intervals in different tuning systems, and in fact the interval of one cent is too small to be heard between successive notes.

Alexander J. Ellis based the measure on the acoustic logarithms decimal semitone system developed by Gaspard de Prony in the 1830s, at Robert Holford Macdowell Bosanquet's suggestion. Ellis made extensive measurements of musical instruments from around the world, using cents extensively to report and compare the scales employed,[1] and further described and employed the system in his 1875 edition of Hermann von Helmholtz's On the Sensations of Tone. It has become the standard method of representing and comparing musical pitches and intervals. (from: Cent (music) - Wikipedia)

Monzo
For example, the interval 15/8 can be thought of as having 5*3 in the numerator, and 2*2*2 in the denominator. This can be compactly represented by the expression 2^-3 * 3^1 * 5^1, which is exactly equal to 15/8. We construct the monzo by taking the exponent from each prime, in order, and placing them within the | ... > brackets, hence yielding |-3 1 1>.

Practical hint: Because the pipe symbol and the greater sign have special meaning in wiki syntax and HTML, there is a helper template (Template:Monzo) that can be used like this {{Monzo|arguments}} to get the monzo brackets (|arguments>) from it.

Here are some common 5-limit monzos, for your reference:

Ratio Monzo
3/2 | -1 1 0 >
5/4 | -2 0 1 >
9/8 | -3 2 0 >
81/80 | -4 4 -1 >

List templates

There are two templates in this wiki for building HTML lists.

Template:List
for creating an unordered list with up to 50 items.
Template:Numlist
for creating a numbered list with up to 50 items.

Both templates were created by User:PiotrGrochowski, please ask him for help and improvements.

See also